The Dan-Air Stewardess

Lorraine at Dan Air
Lorraine with Dan-Air at Newcastle Airport

As I have said previously, I have been lucky enough to come across some great people that have or are currently still working in the aviation industry, thanks to the modern medium of certain social media platforms. One person who I’ve had the fortunate pleasure of connecting with is a former Dan-Air stewardess, Lorraine. Lorraine and I share a mutual passion for this once great British airline. I was lucky enough to fly with Dan-Air myself when the airline was at the top of it’s game; first in 1985 to Majorca, Spain and once again in 1987 to Zakynthos, Greece. Although I was very young at the time, being a plane geek I can remember both journey’s so vividly well. Lorraine has even more memories to share having worked for the airline from 1976 to 1992 and based at Newcastle Airport. She has been kind enough to take some time out to give an insight on the different types of aircraft she worked on, some really scary moments while in the air and what it was like being “The Dan-Air Stewardess”.

What made you want to be an air stewardess? My first flight as a pax [passengers] I was nine years old and it was from LGW/LUX [London Gatwick/Luxembourg] on a BAC1-11 with British Eagle and I think that gave me an interest in flying as a career, I thought it was so glamorous, the girls I noticed were so smart, never would have believed then that my dream would come true and I actually worked on that aircraft as British Eagle folded and Dan Air purchased that aircraft from them.

How did the role at Dan-Air come about? The role came about when I was working as a junior secretary in an office for a telecommunications firm, my mother who worked there also, rang me and said that there was an advert in The Newcastle Journal for Air Hostesses and I should apply for the job, I did and the rest is history.

Can you remember how you felt during the interview process? The interview process I remember very well, it was at the Airport Hotel, I was rather nervous and was interviewed by Dan Air’s Chief Stewardess and NCL’s [Newcastle Airport] base stewardesses. The questions that were asked “if I was married”? That time they did not employ you if you were married, then mostly about how I dealt with situations and how I coped with people, and obviously what qualifications I had, I felt that the interview had gone well.

What are the most important parts of being an air stewardess? The main thing was to make the pax feel comfortable and safe.

What were the stages of recruitment at Dan-Air? I only had one interview, I know other airlines had a process to go through, but not for Dan Air.

Can you give us a brief about the area/team you worked with at NCL? My typical roster was given a fortnight in advance and it would be around eight flights and two standby days per fortnight.

What was the best thing about working for Dan-Air? I can honestly say that working for Dan Air were the best years of my life, when I meet up with my Dan friends they all say exactly the same, that we were very lucky to have had the pleasure of working for them,  they were a great company to work for. Newcastle Airport was such a small and intimate airport that everybody knew each other from the ground staff to the customs, and other airline staff. A lot of our pilots were ex RAF very old school and so gentlemanly and great great characters.

Can you name the type of aircraft you trained and worked on? The aircraft that I worked on were: DeHavilland Comet first commercial jet, and it was my favourite. Such a beautiful aircraft, but rather noisy down at the back especially when taking off! I also worked on the following: HS748, BAC 1-11 all series, B-727, B-737 and the BAE 146.

What was the best place you visited during your time flying? And can you recommend anywhere? Most of our flights from NCL were flown to the destination (all European or internal) and then return on the same day, there was no long haul from NCL then, so we were back home after our flights, we did have night-stops in Bournemouth, and in the latter years Berlin which at the time the Berlin Wall was being taken down and that was fascinating. We were also now and again sent to different bases if there was a shortage of staff.

Tell us about any scary moments when up in the air (or on the ground) that you experienced when working? Two flights that I remember, one was on the HS 748 and we were flying from LGW, as I was serving drinks (on a tray, no trolleys on this aircraft), there was a small jolt, I looked to my right and noticed the propeller was slowly stopping, the captain called me into the flight deck and said that we were making an emergency landing at Dijon and to clear the cabin. Thankfully the aircraft landed safely.
The other time I was on the BAE146, the First Officer brought the aircraft down too steeply banging it down on the runway, all the oxygen masks fell from the cabin ceiling, unfortunately some of the wheels burst and the smell from the rubber filled the cabin, no pax were hurt just rather shocked. I was then sent to LGW to help with enquiries, that for me was the most terrifying!

Do you still keep in touch with any of your ex-colleagues from Dan-Air? I still keep in touch with a lot of the girls that I few with, we have a bond and go a long way back.

If you could, is there anything you’d like to ask Dan-Air? I can’t think what I’d like to ask them, I wish they hadn’t have gone under, but I would like to thank them for the happy years they gave me and for employing me, again the best years of my life loved every minute flying with them.

dan_newcastle1
The Dan-Air crew at Newcastle Airport in 1992. Photo Credit: Dan-Air Remembered & Martin Gascoigne

Thanks so much Lorraine for taking the time and sharing your memories of Dan-Air! IMG_2936 2

Dan-Air was founded in 1953 and ceased operations in 1992 when it merged with British Airways. The airline’s main hubs were London Gatwick, Manchester and Berlin-Tegel as well as focusing on operations at Newcastle.

For more memories please visit:- Dan-Air Remembered

After Berlin

Next to Paris and London, Berlin is the most frequently visited city in Europe. However, more tears have shed here and more admiration expressed than anywhere else, not only by the city’s 3.8 million inhabitants, who still continue to discover their city, but also by over 13 million annual visitors who flock to Berlin – myself being one of them.

Steeped in history, I learned more in one weekend during my visit to Berlin than I ever did studying for five years in the subject of History at secondary school. Drummed in to me was post-war Britain; the VE Day celebrations, rations continued, the East End was a rubble and a new young Queen took to the throne bringing in a new Elizabethan era. As for Germany; sure I knew there was “a wall” that ripped through Berlin. I understood that West Germany’s citizens drove around in Mercedes Benz and BMW’s while East Germany had to make do with that “old banger” the Trabant, I grasped that there was a rich and poor divide and of course, I hadn’t forgotten, witnessing as a child, those flashing news images of German citizens climbing “The Wall” celebrating and taking hammers, pick axes, anything they could get their hands on to bring it down in 1989 however, shamefully that was as far as my IQ went on post-war Germany.

“There is a tipping point at which unmitigated evil is no longer visible” (Tom Buchwald)

As I headed to the Berlin Wall Memorial, the actual physical monstrosity was still visible, albeit just a small section for “keepsakes” purposes. I imagined what if this was London; a huge wall ripping through the middle – separating the boroughs of Kensington and Chelsea, Hammersmith and Fulham, Ealing in the West from Tower Hamlets, Hackney, Barking and Dagenham in the East. I soon became fascinated by the ideology behind this “Wall” and why was it put up in the first place?! Stretching back to the end of World War II with the Americans, British, French and Russians marching victoriously in and splitting Germany up for their own control, the penny finally dropped. I suddenly discovered the GDR (German Democratic Republic), mass emigration from east to west Germany, Soviet occupation Zones, FRG (Federal Republic of Germany), Allied Zones of occupation, the Cold War and “The Wall”. I completely got it. The news images I remember in the 1980s of Germany; the West Germany and East Germany football teams in the World Cup, the classy Mercedes Benz and BMWs in the West and the tatty Trabant car in the East – I suddenly worked it all out. Checkpoint Charlie – tick, Brandenburg Gate – tick, Alexanderplatz – tick. Germany I got you and I felt bad for you.

Besides being a world-city of culture, politics, media, science, universities, museums and an infamous nightlife scene, Berlin is the place to go, see and do. As I came away from this beauty I could not help but ask myself why? All this history; Nazi occupation, Soviet and Allied occupation, The Wall from 1961-1989, full sovereignty from as late as 1994, what was it all for? Generations have suffered post-war and for what?

Before the fall of the Berlin Wall, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher told Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev that neither the United Kingdom nor Western Europe wanted the reunification of Germany.

“We defeated the Germans twice! And now they’re back!” (Margaret Thatcher, 1989)

The fear was still there, long after World War II had ended. A stark reminder that what shaped this city, or rather, destroyed this city, can never happen again. Germany was not the only state that had been separated through the aftermaths of World War II. For example, Korea as well as Vietnam have been separated through the occupation of “Western-Capitalistic” and “Eastern-Communistic” forces, after the defeat of the Japanese Empire. However, Germany is the only one of these countries that has managed to achieve a peaceful reunification.

Pulled from the monstrous product of war and the humdrum of divide and communism, Berlin offers a magnitude of creativity and the success of this has been the catalyst for the city’s thriving music scene, active nightlife, and bustling street scene all of which have become important attractions for the German capital.

For details please visit:- visitBerlin